December Article

A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE – BOB FINNEY’S STORY OF METAMORPHOSIS HAS A GOOD ENDING

There was a time when Bob Finney knew about ten words.  He knows and uses hundreds now.  There was a time when he got kicked out of communal places like libraries and the YMCA.  Now, he is recognized and welcomed throughout his community.  There was a time when he would violently injure himself and was physically restrained.  Now, he raises Monarch butterflies, takes trips, does volunteer work, helps around the house, and is joined in a community of friends and neighbors with a story to tell…

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Nov Article

A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE: AUTHOR RACHEL SIMON TO SPEAK AT MOVE TO INCLUDE NOV. 7

In 2002 when “Riding the Bus with My Sister”
came out in print, Beth Simon had arranged with
her sister and boyfriend to have a book signing
event in the drivers’ room at the bus company,
coordinated to happen during a shift change to
give all the drivers a chance to get books and
autographs. Beth’s boyfriend didn’t read or write
but he could sign his name; and Beth’s sister,
Rachel – well, she wrote the book.
“Riding the Bus with My Sister” is a memoir
about the year Rachel Simon spent riding buses
with her younger sister, Beth, who is a bus
enthusiast among other interests. Rachel Simon
was well acquainted with the makeup of her
sister’s intellectual disability and how it might
manifest, but it was her strange world of buses:
the people who drove them and the people who
rode them, that contributed to what Rachel now
describes as… CLICK HERE TO READ MORE 

September Article

A Matter of Perspective: Fighting the Good Fight

Taylor Swift shouts through the van speakers:
“… I keep cruising, can’t stop, won’t stop
moving …” Caitlyn Nichols is at the wheel,
singing along with her passenger in the back
where wheelchair tiedowns creak to the beat.
The pair are on their way to Portsmouth for
a day of work and whatever fun they can
squeeze from their time together.
Nichols wryly points out that it’s only
natural she would have become a direct
support provider (DSP), since her mother
spent several years as a DSP with the same
organization.

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August Article

A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE: A FIRE WITHIN

Chelsea Brown had been swimming competitively
since she was 8 years old so perhaps it wasn’t
an especially important meet for her. But her
parents, Gail and Bob, remember the summer
of 2006 well, when Chelsea was one of only two
female swimmers representing New Hampshire at
the first national games of the Special Olympics.
Prior to that, every state had its own games but
that July, some 3,000 athletes from around the
country, along with about 40,000 spectators,
converged on Ames, Iowa to take part in the
inaugural national games.

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K.D. Website 2

A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE: KRISTEN DAVIDSON NAMED STATE’S MISS AMAZING PAGEANT WINNER

With 20 years of hindsight looking back at a girl dancing in her yard and playing dress up, it seems only logical now that Kristen Davidson would have landed comfortably in the world of pageants.  Crowned New Hampshire Miss Amazing earlier this year, Davidson will join contestants from 35 states gathered at a hotel outside Chicago to compete in a national pageant in August.

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BowWow2

A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE: BOW-WOW BONES SEEKS MORE STORES TO SELL ITS DOG TREATS

Their ribboned packages are becoming more and more recognizable in the Seacoast. From Barker’s Farm in Stratham to the Nubble Lighthouse Gift Shop in York, Bow-Wow Bones dog treats is gaining a strong and loyal fanbase among the pet set. But behind the scenes, the makers of Bow-Wow Bones have their own strong commitment to the work. Overcoming a common stigma in a world that sees their disabilities first, they have a shared belief in their ability to deliver a quality product.
It’s been seven years since two Portsmouth High School teachers tinkered with recipes and started baking dog treats in the school kitchen with a small class of students in the school’s Transition Program. Now formally and legally known as Bow Wow Bones, Inc., the operation is still going strong today. And though the bakers and baggers, and even the kitchen locations, have changed over the years, the core group that came together at the start remains at the core of the effort today to enable Seacoast adults with disabilities to contribute to the community and take part in a business of their own.

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